Little does he know…

I took a very special custom project on this year from a incredible lady who has waited 40 years for it to come along! Connie and her husband eloped in 1972; John gave Connie a simple gold band for their secret wedding & she proudly wore it every day since.

This lovely lady, healing information pills Connie has been to see me at a show I do in  Bragg Creek for 3 years running.  We’ve talked each year about doing a horse shoe wedding ring for her, ed but she wasn’t quite sure.  It was a big deal to take that gold band off her hand in more ways than one!  The ring would need to be cut right off her hand and she wasn’t sure that she wanted it off.  Wearing a piece of jewelry for 40 years, information pills you feel a little naked without it!

So finally this year, Connie knew that she kept coming back to the design and that usually means its right.  I get this reaction a lot about the family rings; people say they keep looking at the ring and keep coming back to it, so it must be a sign.

Connie’s Mother recently passed away and so Connie inherited her Mother’s ring.  It is a beautiful, ornate gold and diamond ring that her mother had worn since 1938.  Connie had never had a diamond and wanted to incorporate her Mother’s diamond into her new wedding ring.

This scared the hell out of me!  I am comfortable in my skills as a metal/goldsmith; but cutting up someone’s 74 year old heirloom is a whole other deal.

So Connie had the gold band cut off her finger and we started on the plan.  I would use her wedding ring to build 3 gold horse shoes and we would use the diamond from her Mother’s ring for the center horse shoe.

I needed to work with the curve of the ring to maintain the integrity of the 18K gold,  instead of trying to flatten these pieces out and then bend them into horse shoes.  This presented a bit of a challenge.  I ended up hammering these curves flat as they were and then bending them into horse shoes.  I felt like a bit of a ‘shoe-er’ pounding and then heating up the gold to anneal it (make it pliable again) and pounding some more!

This is how most of the horse shoe rings start.  I choose to narrow the rings at the back as they are much more comfortable to wear that way.  The 2 rope edge rings are measured and cut at the same time.

Here the horse shoes are almost done and ready to be soldered on to the ring blank.  They were tricky, but well worth it.

Here’s a dry fit ready to solder together before I put the diamond inside that middle horse shoe.  The great part about Connie’s ring is that she needed exactly the same size as my family ring, so I could feel that the size was going to be right.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

My mentor, Shirley Paradis aka Obi Wan, had the great idea that we should use the setting on Connie’s Mum’s ring as is instead of taking the diamond out.  The setting is sturdy and had clearly lasted 74 years as it is, so why mess with it?  The diamond was still firmly in place and I thought it would be another great way to incorporate some more family history into this project.  So I cut the square setting off the top of the ring & went about attaching it to the sterling band.

Everything went fantastic, the ring was all polished and ready for delivery.  Connie was so pleased, she got teary-eyed when she put it on!  Its amazing how girls never tire of diamonds, they really are ‘our best friend’!  Connie had never had a diamond and the fact that it was her Mother’s made it even more meaningful.  I’ve never had a reaction like that to my work, and it really made me proud to be able to share it with such a fantastic couple!


I took a very special custom project on this year from a incredible lady who has waited 40 years for it to come along! Connie and her husband eloped in 1972; John gave Connie a simple gold band for their secret wedding & she proudly wore it every day since.

This lovely lady, hospital Connie has been to see me at a show I do in  Bragg Creek for 3 years running.  We’ve talked each year about doing a horse shoe wedding ring for her, viagra 40mg but she wasn’t quite sure.  It was a big deal to take that gold band off her hand in more ways than one!  The ring would need to be cut right off her hand and she wasn’t sure that she wanted it off.  Wearing a piece of jewelry for 40 years, you feel a little naked without it!

So finally this year, Connie knew that she kept coming back to the design and that usually means its right.  I get this reaction a lot about the family rings; people say they keep looking at the ring and keep coming back to it, so it must be a sign.

Connie’s Mother recently passed away and so Connie inherited her Mother’s ring.  It is a beautiful, ornate gold and diamond ring that her mother had worn since 1938.  Connie had never had a diamond and wanted to incorporate her Mother’s diamond into her new wedding ring.

This scared the hell out of me!  I am comfortable in my skills as a metal/goldsmith; but cutting up someone’s 74 year old heirloom is a whole other deal.

So Connie had the gold band cut off her finger and we started on the plan.  I would use her wedding ring to build 3 gold horse shoes and we would use the diamond from her Mother’s ring for the center horse shoe.

I needed to work with the curve of the ring to maintain the integrity of the 18K gold,  instead of trying to flatten these pieces out and then bend them into horse shoes.  This presented a bit of a challenge.  I ended up hammering these curves flat as they were and then bending them into horse shoes.  I felt like a bit of a ‘shoe-er’ pounding and then heating up the gold to anneal it (make it pliable again) and pounding some more!

This is how most of the horse shoe rings start.  I choose to narrow the rings at the back as they are much more comfortable to wear that way.  The 2 rope edge rings are measured and cut at the same time.

Here the horse shoes are almost done and ready to be soldered on to the ring blank.  They were tricky, but well worth it.

Here’s a dry fit ready to solder together before I put the diamond inside that middle horse shoe.  The great part about Connie’s ring is that she needed exactly the same size as my family ring, so I could feel that the size was going to be right.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

My mentor, Shirley Paradis aka Obi Wan, had the great idea that we should use the setting on Connie’s Mum’s ring as is instead of taking the diamond out.  The setting is sturdy and had clearly lasted 74 years as it is, so why mess with it?  The diamond was still firmly in place and I thought it would be another great way to incorporate some more family history into this project.  So I cut the square setting off the top of the ring & went about attaching it to the sterling band.

Everything went fantastic, the ring was all polished and ready for delivery.  Connie was so pleased, she got teary-eyed when she put it on!  Its amazing how girls never tire of diamonds, they really are ‘our best friend’!  Connie had never had a diamond and the fact that it was her Mother’s made it even more meaningful.  I’ve never had a reaction like that to my work, and it really made me proud to be able to share it with such a fantastic couple!


I took a very special custom project on this year from a incredible lady who has waited 40 years for it to come along! Connie and her husband eloped in 1972; John gave Connie a simple gold band for their secret wedding & she proudly wore it every day since.

This lovely lady, approved Connie has been to see me at a show I do in  Bragg Creek for 3 years running.  We’ve talked each year about doing a horse shoe wedding ring for her, there but she wasn’t quite sure.  It was a big deal to take that gold band off her hand in more ways than one!  The ring would need to be cut right off her hand and she wasn’t sure that she wanted it off.  Wearing a piece of jewelry for 40 years, viagra sale you feel a little naked without it!

So finally this year, Connie knew that she kept coming back to the design and that usually means its right.  I get this reaction a lot about the family rings; people say they keep looking at the ring and keep coming back to it, so it must be a sign.

Connie’s Mother recently passed away and so Connie inherited her Mother’s ring.  It is a beautiful, ornate gold and diamond ring that her mother had worn since 1938.  Connie had never had a diamond and wanted to incorporate her Mother’s diamond into her new wedding ring.

This scared the hell out of me!  I am comfortable in my skills as a metal/goldsmith; but cutting up someone’s 74 year old heirloom is a whole other deal.

So Connie had the gold band cut off her finger and we started on the plan.  I would use her wedding ring to build 3 gold horse shoes and we would use the diamond from her Mother’s ring for the center horse shoe.

I needed to work with the curve of the ring to maintain the integrity of the 18K gold,  instead of trying to flatten these pieces out and then bend them into horse shoes.  This presented a bit of a challenge.  I ended up hammering these curves flat as they were and then bending them into horse shoes.  I felt like a bit of a ‘shoe-er’ pounding and then heating up the gold to anneal it (make it pliable again) and pounding some more!

This is how most of the horse shoe rings start.  I choose to narrow the rings at the back as they are much more comfortable to wear that way.  The 2 rope edge rings are measured and cut at the same time.

Here the horse shoes are almost done and ready to be soldered on to the ring blank.  They were tricky, but well worth it.

Here’s a dry fit ready to solder together before I put the diamond inside that middle horse shoe.  The great part about Connie’s ring is that she needed exactly the same size as my family ring, so I could feel that the size was going to be right.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

My mentor, Shirley Paradis aka Obi Wan, had the great idea that we should use the setting on Connie’s Mum’s ring as is instead of taking the diamond out.  The setting is sturdy and had clearly lasted 74 years as it is, so why mess with it?  The diamond was still firmly in place and I thought it would be another great way to incorporate some more family history into this project.  So I cut the square setting off the top of the ring & went about attaching it to the sterling band.

Everything went fantastic, the ring was all polished and ready for delivery.  Connie was so pleased, she got teary-eyed when she put it on!  Its amazing how girls never tire of diamonds, they really are ‘our best friend’!  Connie had never had a diamond and the fact that it was her Mother’s made it even more meaningful.  I’ve never had a reaction like that to my work, and it really made me proud to be able to share it with such a fantastic couple!


I took a very special custom project on this year from a incredible lady who has waited 40 years for it to come along! Connie and her husband eloped in 1972; John gave Connie a simple gold band for their secret wedding & she proudly wore it every day since.

This lovely lady, cheapest Connie has been to see me at a show I do in  Bragg Creek for 3 years running.  We’ve talked each year about doing a horse shoe wedding ring for her, but she wasn’t quite sure.  It was a big deal to take that gold band off her hand in more ways than one!  The ring would need to be cut right off her hand and she wasn’t sure that she wanted it off.  Wearing a piece of jewelry for 40 years, order you feel a little naked without it!

So finally this year, Connie knew that she kept coming back to the design and that usually means its right.  I get this reaction a lot about the family rings; people say they keep looking at the ring and keep coming back to it, so it must be a sign.

Connie’s Mother recently passed away and so Connie inherited her Mother’s ring.  It is a beautiful, ornate gold and diamond ring that her mother had worn since 1938.  Connie had never had a diamond and wanted to incorporate her Mother’s diamond into her new wedding ring.

This scared the hell out of me!  I am comfortable in my skills as a metal/goldsmith; but cutting up someone’s 74 year old heirloom is a whole other deal.

So Connie had the gold band cut off her finger and we started on the plan.  I would use her wedding ring to build 3 gold horse shoes and we would use the diamond from her Mother’s ring for the center horse shoe.

I needed to work with the curve of the ring to maintain the integrity of the 18K gold,  instead of trying to flatten these pieces out and then bend them into horse shoes.  This presented a bit of a challenge.  I ended up hammering these curves flat as they were and then bending them into horse shoes.  I felt like a bit of a ‘shoe-er’ pounding and then heating up the gold to anneal it (make it pliable again) and pounding some more!

This is how most of the horse shoe rings start.  I choose to narrow the rings at the back as they are much more comfortable to wear that way.  The 2 rope edge rings are measured and cut at the same time.

Here the horse shoes are almost done and ready to be soldered on to the ring blank.  They were tricky, but well worth it.

Here’s a dry fit ready to solder together before I put the diamond inside that middle horse shoe.  The great part about Connie’s ring is that she needed exactly the same size as my family ring, so I could feel that the size was going to be right.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

My mentor, Shirley Paradis aka Obi Wan, had the great idea that we should use the setting on Connie’s Mum’s ring as is instead of taking the diamond out.  The setting is sturdy and had clearly lasted 74 years as it is, so why mess with it?  The diamond was still firmly in place and I thought it would be another great way to incorporate some more family history into this project.  So I cut the square setting off the top of the ring & went about attaching it to the sterling band.

Everything went fantastic, the ring was all polished and ready for delivery.  Connie was so pleased, she got teary-eyed when she put it on!  Its amazing how girls never tire of diamonds, they really are ‘our best friend’!  Connie had never had a diamond and the fact that it was her Mother’s made it even more meaningful.  I’ve never had a reaction like that to my work, and it really made me proud to be able to share it with such a fantastic couple!


Little does my son know that this experience will change his life forever. 

My son, Finn who is 9 just finished competing in his first year of 4H public speaking.  He delivered a fantastic speech that he wrote himself with a little help with grammar and delivery.  Its called, “My Donkey Adventure”.  He wanted to write about halter breaking his calves with a donkey.  It definitely has been an adventure.

Finn wasn’t very nervous and seemed to enjoy getting more and more animated each time he practiced it.  He went to his sister’s clubs public speaking event to get a feel for what would happen.  There is a little firecracker in that club that excels at public speaking and Finn decided when he got home that he would just say his speech like Sasha does!  Very observant for his first time.

Below is a little clip of his speech..

My Donkey Adventure 2012 (trimmed)

It is amazing how well the Junior members did (aged 9-11) and even the Cleaver Kids (6-8 year olds)!  They were enthusiastic in their deliveries and confident with their impromptu speeches.  One judge said it best when she told them that they just did something that most adults are terrified to do!

My husband and I feel very strongly about the merits of the 4H program.  All 4 of our children will participate in a 4H club of their choice. I’m sure you’ll find similar comments from fellow 4H’ers whatever their age.  The public speaking element is what scared me away from it as a child, but is one of the most beneficial, I think.  I hear from lots of friends that credit the 4H program with leading them to the jobs they have, the life-long friends and of course the whole idea of ‘Learn to Do by Doing’!

Finn will be going to the next level of competition this Saturday and we’re super thrilled for him to achieve this in his first year of 4H!

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